learning with things 2

 

some Things

explorations in making, responding, interpreting, conversing, creating, and recreating. 

 
 

handprinted workbooks 

Four work books I made in response to Eisner’s “Three Lessons that all Schools Teach” in The Educational Imagination(2002). I hand painted and made these workbooks with images of things that I see and confront on a daily basis. I asked that my classmates and professor interact with the books and write their interpretation or judgement about these things on the inside. Afterwards we discussed our reactions, what the pairing of two objects can possibly say, how painting these things may change our read, and how interacting with the book made us think about/reflect on the things. Each workbook included a picture of a book I have, but have not read yet and an object or plant that is experiences through our senses. 

 1/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Catalina Hernández-Cabal, 2018. 

1/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Catalina Hernández-Cabal, 2018. 

Beavis and Butthead and Sage Work Book (inside 1-Cata).jpg
Beavis and Butthead and Sage Workbook (inside 2-Cata).jpg
Donna Haraway and Sunglasses Workbook.jpg
 2/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Shivani Bhalla, 2018. 

2/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Shivani Bhalla, 2018. 

Foucault and Plant Workbook.jpg
 3/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Sarah Travis, 2018. 

3/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Sarah Travis, 2018. 

Sonic Youth 33 1-3 and Plant.jpg
 4/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Ahu Yolac

4/4 hand-painted workbooks, 4 1/2 x 6 inches, response by Ahu Yolac


drawing new(s) 

These drawings are part of a larger drawing I made while mapping out some of the main points I found while reading texts on curriculum studies. This process is helpful when positioning names, authors, ideas, terms, and paths which guide relations between each. 

 Drawing from texts in Sarah Travis'  class Curriculum and Development in Art (Spring 2018). This drawing came from a text we read about the mystery of education by Samuel D. Rocha. The text came from his book  Folk Phenomenology . 

Drawing from texts in Sarah Travis'  class Curriculum and Development in Art (Spring 2018). This drawing came from a text we read about the mystery of education by Samuel D. Rocha. The text came from his book Folk Phenomenology

 This is a drawing of Maxine Greene. In S.Travis' class we read her text, “The Continuing Search for Curriculum” in  Releasing the imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social change (1995). 

This is a drawing of Maxine Greene. In S.Travis' class we read her text, “The Continuing Search for Curriculum” in Releasing the imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social change(1995). 

 This is a drawing of Madeleine R. Grumet. The week I drew this image we read her text “Conception, Contradiction, and Curriculum” which is part of  Bitter Milk: Women and Teaching  (1988). 

This is a drawing of Madeleine R. Grumet. The week I drew this image we read her text “Conception, Contradiction, and Curriculum” which is part of Bitter Milk: Women and Teaching (1988). 

 This is a drawing of William F. Pinar. We read Pinar’s “The Reconceptualization of Curriculum Studies” published in Flinder’s and Thorton’s  The Curriculum Studies Reader  (1998) .

This is a drawing of William F. Pinar. We read Pinar’s “The Reconceptualization of Curriculum Studies” published in Flinder’s and Thorton’s The Curriculum Studies Reader (1998).


  .  Drawing Lear—Test Print (2018). I made this print in the process of creating books based on Jonathan Lear’s book  Radical Hope and his reflection on the text, “The Call of Another’s Words” (2014). After asking my class to engage in a collective reading of the books I made, all which had pulled quotes from Lear, my professors asked me to present the piece again at the Humanities and Public Life: A symposium of the Illinois 150 conference onThe 21st Century University and Research for the Public Good. I made fifty books as part of that project and this quote was printed inside ten of those books. 

Drawing Lear—Test Print (2018). I made this print in the process of creating books based on Jonathan Lear’s book Radical Hopeand his reflection on the text, “The Call of Another’s Words” (2014). After asking my class to engage in a collective reading of the books I made, all which had pulled quotes from Lear, my professors asked me to present the piece again at the Humanities and Public Life: A symposium of the Illinois 150 conference onThe 21st Century University and Research for the Public Good. I made fifty books as part of that project and this quote was printed inside ten of those books.